Universal iOS App for the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad
Sale Price: 14.99 List Price: $19.99 USD
iBird Hawaii/Palau Guide to Birds
  • Ratings: ½ ()
  • Last updated: May 5, 2016
  • Version: 9.21
  • Species Count: 228
  • Database Size: 802 MB

SALE: For the next few days iBird Hawaii/Palau is on sale for only $14.99, that’s 25% off its regular $19.99 price. IBIRD HAWAII/Paluu Guide to Birds—The first iBird app for birding in the tropics! Two years in the making, iBird Hawaii/Palau contains the 228 gorgeous endemic and non-native species found in all eight of the Hawai'i Islands including: Hawaii, Kahoolawe, Kauai, Lanai, Maui, Molokai, Nihau and Oahu, and 169 birds from the island nation of Palau. iBird Hawaii/Palau is designed for all versions of Apple devices including the new iPhone 6, 6 Plus and iPad Retina (1). Why should you own iBird Hawaii/Palau? ■ Birding professionals consider iBird's intelligent "Percevia" search engine the absolute best way to identify birds. It essentially turns you into an expert and IDs your species with a modicum of information. Read what Diana Doyle of American Birding Association’s BIRDING magazine, said about this: "If you’re looking for the most expansive digital key, the encyclopedia-like iBird excels. It has the most sophisticated algorithm, incorporates live location, shows search results in real time (with a slide show option) and has the most fine-grained advanced key choices.” -"The Quest for a Bird Identification Key" March/April 2014 issue

▶ NEW RELEASE - IBIRD HAWAII - A LISTING APP MADE FOR IBIRD           ▶ UPDATED SPECIES NAMES - Updated the common names of ???

As a standalone app, iBird does not require an Internet connection for access to the rich media information in its database. This does mean that the application is large, so please be patient when downloading.

You can also keep up to date with fellow iBird users by following @iBirdExplorer on Twitter and by joining the iBird fan page on Facebook.

If you use iBird in the field, please do so responsibly. We recommend the American Birding Association's Code of Ethics (http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html), particularly section 1(b), for guidance.